Perpetual claims solo 3rd

first_imgSBP eyes record crowds for 3×3 tourney MOST READ 8th Top Leaders Forum assessed the progress of public-private efforts in building climate and disaster resilient communities University of Perpetual Help climbed to third spot of the NCAA Season 93 women’s volleyball tournament after fending off woeful Emilio Aguinaldo College, 22-25, 25-19, 25-14, 23-25, 15-13, Thursday at Filoil Flying V Centre.ADVERTISEMENT Read Next Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Asian shares slide on weak Japan data; US markets closed Do not bring these items in SEA Games venuescenter_img BI on alert for illegally deployed OFWs to Iraq Letran, meanwhile, brought itself closer to the top four after fending off Lyceum, 28-26, 20-25, 26-24, 25-22, in the other match.The Lady Knights reached .500 territory as they improved to 2-2 and tied Jose Rizal University at the fifth spot while the Lady Pirates are in a rough patch with a 1-3 record. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH The Lady Altas improved to 3-1, just half a game behind second-running San Beda (3-0), while the Lady Generals stayed at the bottom of the ladder with a 0-4 slate.The Lady Altas have now forged two tough five-set victories and head coach Macky Cariño sees this as a testament to the team’s character.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“If you really don’t have that strength within you will fail,” said Cariño.Skipper Maria Tripoli and Maria Clemente each had 15 points for the Lady Altas while Allysa Sangalang and Hershey Llorente added 11 and 10 points, respectively. View commentslast_img read more

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Several IAS officers transferred in Maharashtra

first_imgMumbai, Apr 22 (PTI) Maharashtra government today effected transfers of several IAS officers. Nitin Gadre (IAS 1989 batch) who was Enquiry Officer at General Administration Department, was posted as Principal Secretary, Tourism and Culture, an official release said here. Valsa Nair Singh, (IAS 1991 batch), Principal Secretary Tourism and Culture, was appointed the Principal Secretary, Enquiry Officer, GAD, Civil Aviation and Excise. S V R Srinivas, (IAS 1991 batch), Managing Director, SICOM, was appointed Officer On Special Duty, Dharavi Redevelopment Project. Surendra Bagde (IAS 1993 batch), Secretary Social Welfare, was appointed General Manager, BEST. Mahesh Zagade (IAS 1993 batch), CEO, PMRDA, was posted as Divisional Commissioner of Nashik. Dinesh Waghmare (IAS 1994 batch), Municipal Commissioner, Pimpri Chinchwad, was appointed Secretary, Social Welfare. K H Govindraj (IAS 1995 batch), Managing Director, MTDC was posted as MD, SICOM. C N Dalvi (IAS 1995 batch) Commissioner, Cooperation, was posted as Divisional Commissioner of Pune. S Chokalingam (IAS 1996 batch) Divisional Commissioner, Pune was posted as Settlement Commissioner. Eknath Dawale (IAS 1997 batch), Divisional Commissioner, Nashik, was posted as Secretary, Water Conservation and EGS. R R Jadhav (IAS 1998) Tribal Commissioner, was posted as Dairy Commissioner. S P Kadu-Patil (IAS 1998 batch), Settlement Commissioner, was posted as Commissioner, Sugar. J D Patil (IAS 1998 batch), General Manager, BEST, was posted as Commissioner, Cooperation. R G Kulkarni (IAS 2000 batch) Dairy Commissioner, was posted as Tribal Commissioner. Nidhi Pandey (IAS 2001 batch) Aurangabad Collector, was posted as CEO, Rajiv Gandhi Arogya Yojana Society, Mumbai. Rajaram Mane (IAS 2001) Commissioner, Sports, was posted as Director General, Maharashtra Energy Development Agency. S M Kendrekar (IAS 2002 batch) Joint Managing Director, CIDCO, was posted as Joint MD, MSEDCL, Aurangabad. Vijay Zade (IAS 2002 batch) Buldhana Collector, was posted as the Commissioner, Sports. Vijay Waghmare (IAS 2004 batch) Commissioner Skill Development, was posted as MD, MTDC. Suresh Kakani (IAS 2004), Nanded Collector, was posted as MD, Maharashtra Airport Development Company. Anil Kawde (IAS 2004) Ahmadnagar Collector, was posted as Inspector General of Registration, Pune. Pandurang Pole (IAS 2004 batch), Latur Collector, was posted as CEO, Slum Rehabilitation Authority, Pune. PTI MR KRKadvertisementlast_img read more

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Peer support workers on front lines of the OD crisis need support

first_imgVANCOUVER – Trey Helten has known almost every one of the 50 or so people he has treated for overdoses on Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside since February.As a former heroin and methamphetamine user who lived in the neighbourhood for three years before getting clean and returning “to do something positive,” he’s one of many peer support volunteers and workers playing a vital role in stemming the overdose crisis that has devastated the province.Unlike professional workers such as paramedics and firefighters, Helten and many peer support volunteers are dealing with the loss of their friends, with no formalized supports in place.“It would be nice if we had regular access to some sort of 24/7 counselling down here. I just knew one participant who came back from his tent and found his girlfriend dead from an overdose. And he didn’t really have anyone else to talk to. It just encourages the cycle (of drug use),” he said.Helten himself had a tough day recently when a drug user reverted to childlike state, asking his mother why she didn’t protect him from his stepfather, but Helten said he managed to avoid relapsing by phoning his Narcotics Anonymous sponsor.“I walked off shift that day feeling like my eyes were vibrating,” he said. “It had really upset me and I felt like I had a contact high.”Consistently, he has heard that peer support workers and volunteers are more trusted by drug users because they have shared experience. He has also heard they need more support than they’re getting.They are often drug users themselves and are being traumatized again by the scope of loss in their community, he said.“We’ve spoken with a number of peers who’ve subsequently left peer positions or moved on from them just because they can’t cope with the stress they’re experiencing,” McNeil said.“They’re both dealing with the stress and hazards of doing the work that they do while also losing people in their community — friends, family members and so on.”The BC Coroners Service said 1,451 people died of illicit drug overdoses last year in the province.Helten said he wouldn’t be alive today if it weren’t for safe-injection sites and the peer support workers who helped him. So he wanted to return to the Downtown Eastside after getting clean to do his part.“I was an IV heroin and crystal methamphetamine user, covered in scabs, 160 pounds, jaundiced, yellow eyes, very sickly,” said Helten, 35.“Peer support workers were the only people who treated me like a human being while I was in my addiction.”Helten spends at least five hours a day volunteering with the Overdose Prevention Society and receives a daily $10 honorarium for his work.While he doesn’t expect full pay, Helten said more recognition of the role that peer support volunteers play would go a long way.For him, the ideal would be a scholarship fund or education support. He’d like to be a social worker someday.In the meantime, he’s adding the work he does with the Overdose Prevention Society to his resume.Sarah Blyth, executive director of the Overdose Prevention Society, said peer volunteers are often the first people on the scene, reviving drug users with naloxone and other emergency measures.“They’re the unsung heroes for sure in this crisis,” she said.The Overdose Prevention Society provides them with training, a certificate that will hopefully help lead to future employment and connects them with counsellors when needed. Support is often arranged on an ad hoc basis and the society might help volunteers find housing or veterinarians for their animals.“We do what we can. We get concert tickets, everything else that they deserve, we try to get them time off and we fundraise for them,” she said.Blyth said she’d like to see peer workers recognized in a more formal way.“I think making sure that people have, when everything is said and done, support and opportunities to move up and move forward into employment. Because there’s nobody better, nobody more qualified in this crisis than these front-line workers.”There are some supports in place. In June, for example, the provincial government said its mobile response team had provided critical incident support and training to more than 6,000 people working on the front lines.The 13-member team includes counsellors, psychologists, trauma experts and first responders and it has travelled to 57 communities in B.C.“Workers being exposed to frequent traumatic events may be susceptible to compassion fatigue, trauma, and other stress-related harm. The MRT helps people proactively address the cumulative stress of their jobs during the overdose crisis,” the Provincial Health Services Authority said in a news release.The B.C. government has committed $1.7 million for two years for the team.McNeil said initiatives like the team may fill some gaps, but not all of them. Existing supports tend to vary by organization and by the level of employment the peers have, from volunteers to full-time staff.“We just need more resources.”last_img read more

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Ottawa willing to explore scrapping Indian Act Aboriginal Affairs department Penashue

first_imgAPTN National NewsMONCTON,NB.-The federal government is willing to explore scrapping the Indian Act and the department of Aboriginal Affairs if that is the will of First Nations chiefs, according to Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Peter Penashue.Assembly of First National national Chief Shawn Atleo made the call to scrap the Indian Act and the Aboriginal Affairs department on the first day of the organization’s gathering.The AFN released a document Tuesday broadly outlining a plan to replace the department and the Indian Act with a new agreement between First Nations and the Crown that would create a new way to deliver services to First Nations citizens.Penashue, who was asked by the prime minister to attend the Assembly of First Nations’ annual gathering, said the federal government was currently focused on improving and amending the Indian Act to better the dire situation facing many First Nations communities.The former Innu leader and lone Conservative MP from Newfoundland and Labrador, however, said the government would explore Atleo’s ambitious goals.“(Atleo) is the national chief and he has the assembly of chiefs working under him and if that is the direction he is looking to go then obviously it has to be explored,” said Penashue. “From a governmental point of view, the most important thing is that we work toward supporting and improving what is in the Indian Act, and amendments to the Indian Act, so we can make the process work more effectively for First Nations right across the country.”Penashue said he was involved in plans to hold a historic gathering between First Nations leaders and the prime minister.Atleo has indicated he believes the meeting will be pivotal moment in the relationship between First Nations and Canada and he expects the meeting to be a major step toward his stated mission to radically alter the structural and political relationship between Ottawa and First Nations.Penashue said he expects Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan will be open to Atleo’s proposals.“That the national chief is proposing a different route and a new initiative, that is something that has be looked at and I am sure the prime minister and the Aboriginal Affairs minister will look at it in that context,” said Penashue. “The assembly will decide what their national strategy is, their national chief says he is interested in abolishing the Indian Act, that is the assembly’s position (and) the government will take it and see how we can best deal with the Constitutional responsibilities.”Penashue spoke briefly to the chiefs on Wednesday, delivering a prepared message on behalf of Duncan, who was unable to attend.Atleo, playing a single beat on a drum, sang Penashue a prayer song.“I find it remarkable that in minister Penashue we have a former grand chief and deputy grand chief who is now a minister of the Crown and we welcome him and invite and welcome him back to the assembly that also belongs to him as an Innu man,” said Atleo.last_img read more

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