Showdown for the crown – JC, Wolmer’s clash in Manning final

first_imgWolmer’s Boys will go in search of their first Manning Cup title in more than 20 years when they square off against three-time defending champions Jamaica College at the National Stadium this evening at 6 o’clock. Both teams scored easy wins in the semi-finals last weekend and today’s battle, between two of the island’s top traditional schools, should be close. JC welcomed back talented Tyreek Magee from injury last weekend and he will be a key man for them today. Magee who recently attended a Digicel Kickstart camp at Manchester City in England, was very impressive in last week’s match. He dictated play in midfield and he must be kept quiet today if Wolmer’s hope to dethrone JC. Also expected to shine for JC are Ronaldo Brown, captain Oquin Robinson and leading forward Duhaney Williams. Wolmer’s have come on by leaps and bounds in the latter part of the season and look the team to beat after they lifted the FLOW Super Cup on November 12. Big striker Alphonson Gooden has been leading the way up front while captain Jahwani Hinds has been a tower of strength in defence. Rivaldo English and Andrew Daley are two other key players for Wolmer’s. Wolmer’s coach Vassell Reynolds says his team is bursting with confidence from the FLOW Super Cup victory and their sights are firmly set on the Manning Cup. “I think we will win but it’s two good teams and we will have to go with our A game,” he said. “I told people even before the Super Cup that since I have been coaching I have never seen this level of confidence amongst my players. And since we won the Super Cup and the (Manning Cup) semi-final the confidence has risen,” he told The Gleaner. Reynolds admitted that their defence has been their strength but said they are just as good in attack as they have scored 45 goals in 14 Manning Cup matches. ” … But this is a final and both teams will be motivated to give their best, as it is the Manning Cup at stake. But we need it more than them … I think we will give our all and I am certain that with a little luck the Manning Cup will be at Heroes Circle,” he stated. Many have argued that Miguel Coley’s JC have not faced any of the tournament’s big guns to date this season, and that Wolmer’s are more battle ready but Coley is not perturbed and is just happy to be in the final. “Winning the Manning Cup is always on our agenda and being in the final gives us the best chance to go out and achieve our objective. Before the semi-finals people were saying Holy Trinity are a big team, a tricky team and how they were going to defeat us but we crossed that hurdle . “We realise that this (JC) team is under-appreciated but we respect every team. We have a final in front of us and in terms of a big team, we have Wolmer’s in front of us and that’s the most important thing,” he commented. He noted that Wolmer’s will be on a high after their Super Cup triumph and says full respect must be shown to them. “They are good competitors, they are in the final, we respect them. They have won a competition so far, so we have to give respect to that as well. But we know our strength, we know our determination and what we are all about… So it’s about character, determination and the whole Jamaica College product,” he concluded.last_img read more

admin

Frustrated Knights focused on own bid amid 3-way tie for no. 4

first_imgView comments Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ And in the event that all three teams win their respective final matches in the eliminations, they would be relegated to playoff games to figure out who gets the last semifinals spot.Knights head coach Jeff Napa, though, is not focusing on the fate of the Chiefs and the Golden Stags.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smog“We don’t care what the other teams will do,” said Napa in Filipino Friday after the 73-68 setback at Filoil Flying V Centre.“All we care about right now is the must win on Tuesday against College of St. Benilde. So let’s see what happens.” Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson The Knights had the chance to lock up the fourth seed but Napa’s team faltered in the end game against the defending champions.San Beda went on an 11-2 game-closing run to take the victory and deflate Letran’s hopes of an easier path to the semifinals.“Of course we’re frustrated because the players gave it all,” said Napa. “But we’re still positive and we have to win against Benilde.”ADVERTISEMENT Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ MOST READ For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity.center_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Nadal makes Shanghai semis, ties Agassi for wins in Open Era It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny LATEST STORIES Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netLetran is in a precarious predicament heading into the Final Four of the NCAA Season 93 men’s basketball tournament.After their loss to San Beda, the Knights failed to get a precious edge in the race for a spot in the semifinals as they dropped to 8-9 and tied with Arellano and San Sebastian at the fourth spot.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

admin

White Addresses Ward 7 Concerns

first_imgBy James Wright, Special to the AFRO, jwright@afro.comD.C. Council member Robert White was the keynote speaker at the Marshall Heights Community Development Organization’s “First Fridays” meeting May 4 at the organization’s headquarters in Northeast. White is one of a series of speakers designed to bring the District’s leaders to the ward to talk about matters concerning economic development and governance.In the past few months, D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson (D) and Elissa Silverman (I-At Large) have addressed the group. White spoke to a group of 50 people and he didn’t mince words.Robert White is an at-large Democrat on the D.C. Council. (Courtesy Photo)“When I came to the council, the things that I wanted to prioritize consistently were affordable housing, education, workforce development and addressing the concerns of returning citizens,” he said. “I want to be a voice of the people and those who are left behind on the council.”Ward 7 has the highest percentage of Black residents with 94 percent of its population followed closely by its neighbor, Ward 8, that is 92 percent African American. The ward has working class neighborhoods such as Marshall Heights, Lincoln Heights, Benning Heights, Benning Ridge and Capitol View plus solid middle-class enclaves such as Hillcrest and Penn Branch and gentrifying areas such as Deanwood and Kenilworth.The D.C. Council is considering the comprehensive housing plan that deals with the land use and how the city will use its housing stock and manage its housing policy. White said, in response to a question by the AFRO, that he doesn’t like the comprehensive plan. “I think the comp plan needs to go back to the beginning,” he said. “It doesn’t talk about gentrification and doesn’t sufficiently address how it will keep people from being pushed out of the city. As a result, I am a vocal critic of it.”White is a strong advocate of returning citizens since joining the council in 2016. He is working to get returning citizens a transportation stipend, a free identification card and another staff person added to the District’s office of returning citizens. He also is working on getting $1.5 million for returning citizens to be able to start their own businesses. “All returning citizens want is a shot,” he said.White said that like many District residents with a small child, he deals with paying the high cost of child care. As a legislator, he is dealing with the issue. “It costs $1,800 per month, per child, in the city for quality child care. That is too much,” he said. “Plus, you have many dedicated child care workers who want to work with children but they make an average of $26,000 a year in the city and that is not enough.”Babatunde A. Oloyede is the president of the Marshall Heights Community Development Organization. The “First Fridays” is his brainchild. “We have these forums so that residents and business owners can come meet with city officials and network,” Oloyede told the AFRO. “That way, we can help these businesses grow.”last_img read more

admin

Physicist applies statistical mechanics theories to explain how children learn a language

first_img Journal information: Physical Review Letters Two-year-old children understand complex grammar © 2019 Science X Network Explore further Illustrative derivation trees for (a) simple English sentence, and (b) RNA secondary structure (after [6]). The latter is a derivation of the sequence ‘gacuaagcugaguc’ and shows its folded structure. Terminal symbols are encircled. Credit: arXiv:1809.01201 [cond-mat.dis-nn] More information: E. DeGiuli. Random Language Model, Physical Review Letters (2019). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.122.128301 , On Arxiv: https://arxiv.org/abs/1809.01201center_img Citation: Physicist applies statistical mechanics theories to explain how children learn a language (2019, April 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-physicist-statistical-mechanics-theories-children.html Most parents notice that children learn a language in a standard sort of way—they pick up words as labels for things and then one day, start assembling words they have learned into sentences. Linguists have noticed that the changeover from speaking words to speaking sentences is usually quite abrupt, making many in the brain science field wonder what actually happens. In this new effort, DeGiuli proposes a theory to explain the process and uses physics theories to do it.DeGiuli starts out by suggesting that a context-free grammar (CFG), which covers most human languages, can be viewed as a physical object, conceiving it in a more physical way, such as must be the case inside the heads of people who are able to speak a language. He further proposes that a CFG can be modeled like a physical tree (not just a virtual one such as those typically used to describe CFGs)—with surfaces representing sentences that include all the words a person knows, whether they make sense or not. He then suggests that as a child hears new words and processes them, they begin to build grammar rules in their brain, some of which are deeper than others. The deepness of the rules is assigned as the brain assigns weights to different rules—those with more weight are deemed more likely to lead to sentences that make sense. It is at this point that DeGiuli introduces statistical mechanics theories into his proposal to explain how the weighting process works. He believes it is possible that the brain uses two major factors to decide how to prune branches in the grammar tree: how much a given weighting results in depth assignments within a tree, and how much they do so to arrive at surface-level assignments. In the end, he notes, it would be the sparseness of the tree that defines the level of usability of the tree to form sentences. When it reaches a certain point, the tree suddenly becomes usable and the child begins spouting complete sentences at his or her parents. Eric DeGiuli, a physicist at École Normale Supérieure, has proposed that a human language grammar can be viewed as if it were a physical object, allowing theories such as those in statistical mechanics to explain how a child learns a language. In his paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, he describes his ideas and his hopes that they might one day be associated with neurological evidence. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

admin